Ulterra’s Showcase at LAGCOE 2017

Ulterra was pleased to attend and showcase at the Louisiana Gulf Coast Oil Exposition, or LAGCOE. LAGCOE is one of the world’s premier oil and gas expositions featuring innovative equipment, services, technology, and presentations from worldwide leaders. This event happens biennially and Ulterra was able to make their first attendance a groundbreaking one.

The Ulterra team traveled to Lafayette, Louisiana, from October 24-26, 2017. They were amongst the 17,000+ visitors from 43+ countries and approximately 420 exhibitors that came together for this event. Visitors had the opportunity to attend daily keynote sessions, as well as dozens of technical and international sessions. LAGCOE hosted a notable group of international visitors and exhibitors, including the following countries: Canada, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Ghana, Ukraine, Brazil, and United Arab Emirates.

LAGCOE awarded five companies as New Technology Showcase Winners to present on their innovations. The winning technologies that presented an overview of their innovation included:
• Louisiana CAT — Product Health Connect® Panel
Ulterra Drilling Technologies — PDC drill bit cutting structure: CounterForce®
• Frank’s International — Combination Drillpipe/Casing Spider & Elevator
• HydraLIFT — Rod string lifting device
• Expro — 30,000 psi perforating and drill stem test tool package

Ulterra at LAGCOE 2017

Louisiana Gulf Coast Oil Exposition Ulterra Drilling Technologies at LAGCOE

Ulterra was honored to be picked as a New Technology Showcase Winner from a large group of submissions. Ulterra felt that attending LAGCOE and showcasing their technology would help boost their offshore presence and increase awareness of their already proven successful technology. International Engineering Manager, Matt Case, presented on CounterForce to help further increase their awareness of the technology, particularly the deepwater offshore market. CounterForce was chosen to be the entry of choice due to it meeting the criteria needed to be considered as a submission. CounterForce has been around since 2013 but is still new to the offshore market, and has a proven track record, which made it a largely considerable nominee.

Mitch Dunham, Regional Sales Manager, Eastern US, raved about the success of this event. “Having everyone together there, representing Ulterra, made this event so successful,” said Dunham.
Mitch also believes that Ulterra’s attendance at LAGCOE made them gain positive recognition, especially with potential customers from the Gulf of Mexico and internationally.

Ulterra’s CounterForce technology is designed to take on hard and abrasive geology. The design of the bit causes less vibration on the PDC cutting structure, which allows the bit to be more durable and long-lasting, while improving efficiency, saving drilling time and money. This CounterForce technology is incorporated into many of Ulterra’s PDC bit designs and has very successful field results. As of October 30, 2017, CounterForce has drilled enough footage to go through the planet twice, which is 131,477,280 feet.

During this show, Ulterra was also awarded 1st place for the First Time Exhibitor award. This award was presented to the team on behalf of the LAGCOE committee for their knowledge, engagement, and overall look of their booth.


Downhole Tools, the Technology and Machinery Responsible for Driving Forward the Gas and Oil Industry

The general public has no real concept or understanding of the technical challenges, risks, and difficulties that companies face to discover and then extract oil and natural gas. Companies within the industry need to invest in premium quality tools and remotely controlled equipment to undertake many different jobs that take place many miles below the earth’s surface.

If the equipment proves unreliable or below required standards, it isn’t as simple as calling out the local repair company. Every bit of downtime costs thousands of dollars in lost productivity, which is why the tools and equipment used need to be virtually indestructible.

What Are Downhole Tools?

Downhole tools, as the name suggests, consist of a wide range of different tools that are used in the oil and gas fields to help with the drilling of wells, clearing of blockages, and ensuring that the wells are working to their full capacity. The tools are operated down the hole which forms a part of the well, hence their name. Although the tools themselves tend to be very expensive, they are an excellent investment due to the significant potential to reduce the cost of oil and gas field operations. The conditions under which downhole tools have to perform are hostile and include extreme pressure and high-temperature situations. Let’s examine in greater detail some of the jobs that can be accomplished with the use of downhole tools.

Some of the Different Jobs Where Downhole Tools Prove Invaluable

Well Bottom Communication – For anyone who has ever tried to drill a hole in a wall, the process is relatively easy because you can physically see where you are drilling, and you also receive feedback as you apply or decrease the pressure on the drill. Unfortunately, when you are drilling on the much grander scale of an oil or gas well, this type of personal feedback is not available. That’s where hi-tech communication systems become critically important, as they supply valuable information to the employees and the crew who are operating the drilling system. This information can help to prevent problems, and even warn the crew of impending issues long before they happen, by providing real-time measurements of the drilling process. These type of communication systems have evolved drastically over recent years as technology has advanced. Previously the collected information took a considerable amount of time to travel back to the surface, often only when the drilling assembly was retrieved out of the hole. By the time the feedback was received, there was a potential for the information to be invalid. In recent years these challenges have been largely overcome, with information transmitted in real-time, which has resulted in better knowledge and understanding for the employees, a safer environment, and even the possibility of remote controlling the drilling process from many miles away.

Completions Equipment

The term ‘completion,’ in regards to the oil and gas industry, means the final part of the well’s construction before it is transformed from a basic hole in the ground to an oil or gas producing well. As you might imagine, this final preparation takes a lot of time, energy, and effort. There are a lot of specifications that need to be adhered to for safety precautions, environmental protection, and maximization of production. Various downhole tools are used in the process in order to accomplish multiple complex tasks. If the hole were simply left alone once drilled, it would not take a great deal of time for it to collapse in upon itself. In order to prevent the hole from collapsing, and to maximize production, various steel pipes, screens, plugs, and valves are joined together and then slid into the drilled hole. This allows employees to control and manage the flow of oil or gas into the well from the surrounding rock while also preventing undesired contaminants, such as sand, water, or poisonous gases, from entering the well. All of these operations are conducted by necessity, and downhole tools are required to perform these challenging but essential tasks.

Fishing Tools

The quality of the drilling tools and technology have drastically improved over the years. Regardless of these technological advances, when you are drilling deep down into the earth’s surface, there is always the potential of physically breaking parts of the drilling assembly. It is also possible for the assembly to become stuck or lodged in the hole such that it cannot be easily removed. If and when these issues do occur, a company will have already invested significant sums of money into the well, so it is not a feasible option to simply drill another well. The solution calls for a variety of different tools, known as fishing tools, which have to be individually designed to solve the problem.

Each tool has a specific task and multiple fishing tools might be required to overcome a specific problem or clear a blockage. Some tools will cut or mill specific parts of the drilling assembly, others will sweep or capture loose pieces of junk or debris in the hole while others are designed to spear or grab specific pieces of pipe or the assembly to be able to pull on it. All being well, the tool will remove the broken piece of assembly or other blockage with it out of the well, quickly and effortlessly resolving the problem.

Downhole Drilling Equipment

Obviously, some of the most important downhole tools are the various parts of the drilling assembly that are used to physically drill the hole in the earth including the drill bits which actually cut the rock. It may come as a shock to some people to learn that many oil and gas wells will need to be between 6,000-12,000 feet deep and can be steered and angled at up to 90 degrees in order to hit the right reservoir. There are oil and gas reservoirs that are buried the equivalent of 10 Empire State Buildings stacked one on top of the other under the ground. Hopefully, this will put in to focus the extreme challenges and difficulties that are faced on a daily basis by gas and oil companies as they attempt to find and drill into these reservoirs.

The downhole drilling equipment is controlled from above the surface, by a crew of specialist drilling employees who constantly receive information from the downhole tools and the drilling assembly as it powers its way deeper and deeper into the earth. Drilling holes that are so deep require significant skills and excellent equipment. The high element of risk that field operators face is the reason why it is so essential to use only the best and most innovative tools possible.

Why Choose Ulterra for your Downhole Tools?

Ulterra is one of the leading manufacturers of downhole tools in the world, specializing in the latest technology of drill bits known as PDC. This acronym stands for Polycrystalline Diamond Compact and describes the specialist cutting elements used in this highly engineered and high-tech type of drill bit. Our company philosophy is based on three simple foundations.

• Performance – All of our products are designed and created using only the best components because we understand that when our clients are out in the oil fields in tough and challenging conditions they need products that they can rely on. All of our products deliver time and time again and are trusted by hundreds of companies around the world. When it comes to delivering outstanding performance that simply won’t let you down Ulterra should always be at the top of your list.
• Innovation – The very nature of oil and gas exploration and extraction throws up unusual and unforeseen issues on an almost daily basis. At Ulterra we have some of the best engineers and designers in the industry, who are consistently coming up with new and innovative solutions to the many and varied problems facing these vital industries. We never stop in our desire to make oil and gas extraction safer, more productive and efficient.
• Consistency – Our high-quality tools paired with our outstanding levels of innovation and dedication consistently deliver results that companies can rely on. With so many variables that are unavoidable in oil and gas extraction, it is critical to have as many consistent parts of the equation as possible, and that is another example of the thought process and quality that Ulterra delivers on a daily basis.

Downhole tools are the unsung heroes of the oil and gas industry. Millions of people across the world are totally reliant on gas and oil for fuel, chemicals and plastic products the industry produces; yet they have no understanding or idea of the processes at work to provide them with the things they rely on every day. At Ulterra, we are never content to rest on our laurels. We are determined to keep innovating, and driving the oil and gas industries forward.


New Drilling Bit Design from Ulterra featured in World Oil Article

The following extract on drilling bit design is from World Oil October 2017 and is used by permission.

Uptick in Activity Spurs Development of New Bit Technologies

 

DRILLING BIT DESIGN

Increased drilling activity associated with improving commodity prices is driving drill bit manufacturers to develop more efficient hydraulics for cuttings evacuation in softer formations, in addition to technologies designed to improve one-run success rates in challenging directional applications, and in hard/abrasive formations.

By CRAIG FLEMING, Technical Editor

With continuing advances in PCD cutter technology and improved bit body stability, PDC bits have become the dominant force in the worldwide drilling theater, practically replacing the venerable roller cone product. Their high ROP potential and unparalleled durability make PDC bits the tool of choice in both high- and low-cost environments. Even in the toughest applications traditionally reserved for roller cones, PDCs have virtually eliminated the situations where operators are forced to fall back on these types of bits. Today’s PDC bit technologies will positively impact performance and drive down the real cost/ft.

IMPROVED CUTTINGS EVACUATION

drilling bit designUlterra Drilling Technologies’ latest innovation is the patent-pending SplitBlade PDC bit (Fig. 4) that is increasing ROP and reducing drilling time with reconfigured cuttings evacuation, cutter cleaning, and bit cooling.

Typically, with most PDC technology, recirculated rock cuttings become trapped at the toolface, and the build-up clogs the junk slots. Trying to recut old cuttings that should have been evacuated quickly wastes energy, in addition to degrading the bit.

The company’s research team examined the physical restraints of a basic PDC drill bit. The engineers proposed a new pattern that would maintain the cutters in a cleaner, cooler state. The improved thermal management of the bit face would support the goal of extending bit durability and lead to higher performance.

Using CFD, the team created a distinctive bit body, with new blade geometry, nozzle placement, and cutter layout. By splitting the shape of the primary blades with an angular offset, designers created designated flow channels for the fluid and cuttings. Two nozzles are positioned to support the cutters in the critical area to capitalize on this advancement in bit body construction and hydraulic control. While drilling, cuttings from SplitBlade technology can be evacuated up to seven times faster, compared with conventional designs.

CASE STUDIES

In the LaSalle County portion of the Eagle Ford shale in South Texas, an operator was experiencing poor cuttings removal and plugged nozzles. To solve the issues, an 8½-in. SplitBlade PDC was run, and it drilled the curve 27% faster than offsets. This run set a company formation footage record of nearly 14,000 ft, MD, for the curve and lateral. The ROP of more than 150 ft/hr was 8% faster than the offset average in wells over 10,000 ft. In the eastern Eagle Ford, another operator wanted to reduce the instances of nozzle plugging to improve ROP, and selected an 8½-in. SplitBlade bit. The plan was to improve lateral and overall ROP with better directional control and cuttings removal. The bit was run, and it set a rig footage and ROP record, drilling the lateral at 400 ft/hr instantaneously and, overall, just less than 12,000 ft in under 68 hr. The average ROP of 172 ft/hr was 56% faster than the average run on this rig.

View the original Article here:
Original World Oil Oct 2017 Article PDF

 


Ulterra PDC Bit and MORE Global Water Provision Story

We love this story and are proud to have played a part in MORE’s efforts to address the global water crisis. This story first appeared on the https://more-water.org site. It’s a great read from the perspective of an Ulterra PDC bit. 

What?  You don’t think a drill bit can have a story? Well, I have one.  And it’s a pretty cool story, I think – if anyone cares to listen!  You see, it all started in a factory in Texas, at a company called Ulterra  They are manufacturers of all kinds of drill bits.  But they specialize in PDC Bits.  So, what is a PDC Bit, you may be asking.  Good question.  It stands for Polycrystalline Diamond Compact. That’s a real tongue twister, eh?  All it means is that they use small particles of manufactured diamonds – not the super expensive natural ones that are made into rings and other fine jewelry.  But just as hard. These particles are integrated into randomly oriented crystals to form a thin matrix that is effectively bonded with a tungsten “table”.  These tables can then be easily be brazed onto the steel drill head.  It is only the PDC “table tops” that contact the formation during drilling.  Eventually these cutter heads wear down and have to be replaced.

Anyway, I can’t remember how many holes I drilled as part of a large stable of similar PDC bits, in all shapes and sizes, while working on large drilling platforms in South Texas.  But eventually, me and some of my bit buddies in our group, were cleaned up, packed up and shipped back to the Ulterra factory.  Some of the old timer bits told me not to worry, that I would be back.  I was just going in for my “spa treatment” at Ulterra’s fancy “salon”.  Nothing more than a “wash and perm” they said – and maybe a pedicure!  “Sweet!” I thought.  I could use some R & R. Here I would have my worn PDC cutters removed and brand new ones brazed back into place.  Quickly my trepidation turned to excitement.

But after my visit to the salon – which was wonderful, as expected – and with my brand new sparkling diamond matrix cutting heads, I was not returned back to the oil drill rig.  Instead they took me to some new shop, where some guy came and picked me up.  He seemed really excited when he saw me, which nearly made me blush!  Then he held me up for show while he and his friends took pictures – of me!  I was thinking, “wow, maybe I’m going to get some kind of award, or something!”  But for what, I was trying to reason with myself, while not trying to act too “puffed up”.  Then, of all things, the guy takes me home and sticks me in a corner in his tiny apartment.  “Hey”, that’s no way to treat I star!” I wanted to tell him.  But I didn’t.

Oh, but that’s when it really starts getting weird.  One day he brings home this plastic box on wheels.  Then he sprays some kind of stinky liquid that starts growing into this crazy foam.  While it is still forming he drops me into this gooie quagmire and sprays some more of this gross stuff, all around me.  When it hardens in a short time, he tries, but can’t even move me.  I’m stuck.  But he doesn’t seem to care.  In fact, he actually seems quite impressed with my predicament.  He even shows me off to his neighbor, I remember.

The next thing I know (a few days later), he rolls me into an airport, where they weigh me.  Then after sitting there for the longest time, he takes me over to a corner and cuts off the plastic ties that he used to secure the top of the rolling box.  What now, I thought.  This is getting weirder by the moment.  Before I had the words out of my “mouth”, he starts cutting away at the hardened foam around my body, with this really big pocket knife.  I thought for sure he was going to cut me up, but he was very careful to only cut the foam.  So how did he get this big knife into an airport, I was thinking.  Geez, is he some kind of terrorist, or something.  Oh no!  Better be quiet about that, I figured.

So then he pulls me loose from the container and unscrews this fancy steel connector thing that he had made at another factory, before he put us into the ice chest and sprayed the foam – all around us.  I didn’t tell you about that trip – to the other factory – to have this “skirt thing” fabricated.  Mainly because it’s just too weird, but also because I heard them talking at that factory when they were measuring my “bottom”.  They said I was “too big” to fit on the guy’s pipes.  While they said, “too big”, I know that they really meant “too fat”!  How do you think that made me feel? No way to treat a rising star in the oil and gas drilling arena, right?  Geez, I really don’t get any respect.

Okay, so, we’re back at the airport. When he gets me loose, he unscrews the skirt thing from my “bottom” and lays me back into the ice chest.  But not before taking “skirt guy” and wrapping him in bubble wrap and putting him into his checked bag.  “Oh man!” I thought, “I was enjoying that bubble wrap.”  It was cozy, like a comforter – for wherever we were heading off to.  But it did feel good to have that skirt thing off my bottom, I had to admit.  Then he closed the top and secured it again – for my journey to “who knows where”.

In what seemed like days later, and several plane rides and airport transports, before I once again saw the light of day, but had no idea where I was – only that I couldn’t wait to get out of this box.  (It was, actually three days, as there was a huge mess-up by the folks at Delta-KLM, in getting both me and my drill bit from Houston to Nairobi, after overnights in Atlanta and Amsterdam.  My bags actually didn’t arrive in Nairobi until a day later.)  When finally, my box lid was opened, I was confronted with several quite different-looking folks (different than my traveling friend, anyway).  They were jabbering in a language, also totally different than my friend, while pointing at me.  Evidently they had never seen a high-classed PDC bit like me before, I thought.

Finally, after a lot of turmoil and more jabbering, some nice, quiet-speaking lady, who was talking in a language somewhat similar to my friend – but sweeter, and prettier-sounding, she must have helped my friend work it all out.  She eventually re-closed my box lid and I was rolled out of that building and into a car, apparently.  A short time later – much shorter than the plane rides, I was handed over to my new friend, who seemed excited beyond belief to see me again.  I could see he was beaming as he showed me off to his friends – who looked more like him, I noted.  Once again I’m sure that I blushed.  I couldn’t help it!  He then rolled me into this house and I found myself in my own room.  Awesome, I thought, this is where this guy really lives – in this lovely large house – and not that tiny, cramped apartment.  Good for him, I thought.  Maybe he’s not a looser, after all, I conjectured.

But no, it was not to be, I soon found out.  The next day he again secured me in my box and we went on another car ride – to yet another airport.  “Oh no, not again,” I thought.  But this time I was loaded onto a much smaller plane, I could tell.  I knew that because I could still hear people talking, even as me and my luggage companions were nestled into our own compartment and the plane took off.  Actually it was more like crammed-in than “nestled”.  But this time, no sooner had we taken off, I could tell, but we were landing again.  Then he rolled me out and packed me into another car.  By now I was learning that his name must be Bobu, because that’s what I heard everyone calling him here – and in the US, as I now recall.  In fact a pretty young lady, along with three really cute kids, all called him that as she was helping him finish packing me into my traveling box, before our trip to the airport, I remembered.  Now he was rolling me into another house.  Here, he, once again, opened my box and showed me off to two more of his friends – both of whom looked like him.  But not exactly.

This time I don’t remember blushing.  I was too busy taking in my surroundings.  “Oh my”, I thought, I don’t know if he lives here or his friends do, but this is more like it.  There were beautiful palm trees and flowering tress and plants – everywhere.  I saw more people splashing around in some well-fashioned watering hole and the sky was bright blue and the sun was beaming down.  You have to understand, having spent my whole existence hanging around oil drilling rigs or being screwed deep into rock formations below the surface, this was all quite amazing to me. Surely, this must be drill bit heaven, I concluded.  Finally, a surrounding worthy of my beauty and elegance as a star-studded PDC bit – I justified, if not even somewhat indignantly. Yes – finally, I had arrived!


Ulterra Drilling Technologies Promotes Cancer Awareness for Women By Partnering with Saving True Pairs

Ulterra Drilling Technologies is a Fort Worth based PDC Bit Company known for their iconic teal bits. For the past 4 years, Ulterra has been committed to spreading awareness within the oilfield by collaborating with the organization Saving True Pairs based in Midland, TX. Their mission is to raise awareness of women’s health issues and foster educational and service initiatives that positively embrace women’s health. In Midland County alone 4 out of 5 women over 40 do not get mammograms. This is a big concern and the reasoning behind the organizations motivation to raise funds and awareness.

Ulterra wanted to partner with a local organization where their movement started so when the opportunity arose to partner with Saving True Pairs it was a no brainer. In an effort to help raise awareness in the oilfield every October Ulterra paints their iconic teal bits pink in efforts to support Breast Cancer Awareness Month. “In 2014 only the bits in the Permian were painted pink but over the years we noticed how much of an impact it made so we decided to take it to the next level by painting all bits pink within the U.S” says Rocky Frazier, Vice President of Manufacturing.

The initial partnership between the two started in 2014 when one of Ulterra’s own was hit with the effects of breast cancer. With Ulterra being the big family they are everyone united around the family to shower them with support. “I am so delighted that this has become an annual affair, Saving True Pairs has helped so many women in the Permian Basin get those lifesaving mammograms. They are a great organization to work with, and we see their efforts go a long way.” says Bill Stark, Vice President of Western U.S Operations.
Saving true pairs also host’s an annual Pink the Basin clay shoot which Ulterra has proudly sponsored for the past 4 years. Saving True pairs uses this event to help raise funds to benefit women in the area whom may not otherwise have the resources for a mammogram. In 2016 the organization raised over $100,000 due to the immense amount of support they received. Ulterra hopes 2017 will be even better.

This year Ulterra will once again be sponsoring the Pink the Basin event to further support the cause and its efforts in raising awareness. All of the bits coming out of the Ft.Worth Manufacturing facility will be painted pink during the month of October to spread awareness all throughout the oilfield. The Ulterra family looks forward to the month of October every year. “The excitement has already began, we’ve already started getting pictures of the pink bits making an appearance onto the rigs. It’s awesome to see that our customers are excited to help support the cause too.” States Brittany McPherson, Communications Coordinator.

Ulterra continues to help spread awareness not only by painting their bits pink, but also with a monetary donation. Ulterra will be donating $25,000 this year just as they did in 2016 to help those who are in need of getting those lifesaving mammograms. “It’s always good to know that you can help someone in their time of need, at Ulterra we are one big family so it’s nice to extend a helping hand beyond the oilfield when we get a chance.” says Aron Deen, Director of Marketing and Business Development.

Everyone loves getting together to support great causes at Ulterra. John Clunan, CEO, says “Over the years it’s been amazing to see everyone in the Ulterra family and beyond come together to raise awareness for the cause. It’s a very rewarding feeling being able to see the impact our efforts have made over the years, and we look forward to supporting causes like this in the future.”


Leading oilfield PDC bit company partners with Childhood Cancer Canada Foundation

There are currently more than 10,000 children battling cancer in Canada right now. The Childhood Cancer Canada Foundation is dedicated to creating victories for Canadian children with cancer. On average, only 5% of cancer research funding worldwide is put toward childhood cancer. The Childhood Cancer Canada Foundation has helped raise awareness and generate donations to be put towards childhood cancer research becoming the leading foundation funding national research on pediatric cancer.

Ulterra, LP is a PDC bit company that is partnering with the Childhood Cancer Canada Foundation to help raise awareness for those battling with the diagnosis of childhood cancer and to further research efforts. “At Ulterra we create long lasting relationships with our customers that extend well beyond the works of the field or office. Once it was brought to my attention that one of our customers was dealing with the effects of this awful disease I knew it was our job to help in any way we could. We decided to partner with the Childhood Cancer Canada Foundation to help raise awareness and show our support in funding research for childhood cancer,” said Jason Cunningham, Ulterra Vice President of Canada Operations.

 

With September being National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month Ulterra will be painting all of their iconic teal bits coming out of Canada’s manufacturing facility purple to further help their efforts in raising awareness. “Most people don’t even know that childhood cancer exists and when they hear about it they are very surprised. Childhood cancer is really underfunded so awareness to get the word out becomes very important,” Says Lorena Muñoz, Childhood Cancer Canada Foundation Senior Manager.

In addition to raising awareness, Ulterra will also be donating $25,000 to the Childhood Cancer Canada Foundation on August 25, 2017, in Leduc, Canada to help fund childhood cancer research as well as contribute to the amazing programs they have. Ulterra will extend their efforts into the field by handing out purple t-shirts, as well as educational pamphlets in support of childhood cancer awareness throughout Canada.

Ulterra chose to partner with the Childhood Cancer Canada Foundation due to its commitment and experience when it comes to helping those who have benefited from childhood cancer research and their many other programs. “Our ultimate goal here is not only to raise awareness and funds but to get rid of childhood cancer all together. When we no longer need to be here, that’s when our job is done,” states Muñoz.

In the last 10 years alone the childhood cancer research community has decreased the mortality rate by 25% in children battling cancer. Through various programs, the Childhood Cancer Canada Foundation is able to help many of those who have had to deal with the effects of childhood cancer.

Jason Cunningham states, “This is the reason why organizations like The Childhood Cancer Canada Foundation are so important. So many kids are being affected by this awful disease, it’s not only our duty but an honor to help these families fight the good fight.”

To learn how you can help visit http://www.childhoodcancer.ca/


Hart’s E&P June 2017

Featured in the June issue of Hart’s E&P, Ulterra discusses how new bit designs are pushing drilling boundaries. Over the past year, Ulterra has looked critically at bit design, blade geometry, cutter reinforcement and hydraulics and has been testing new materials, which has resulted in its XP™ line of polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits. With the increased energy going through the bit, it is Ulterra’s goal to make sure the bits do not become the limiting factor in performance.

Hart’s E&P June 2017

Read the full article from Hart’s E&P here.


Ulterra’s Leduc Manufacturing Facility Achieved 2 Years with No Recordables

Ulterra continues to set new standards in all areas of operations with safety being no exception. On April 21, 2017, Ulterra surpassed another safety milestone with the Leduc Manufacturing Facility achieving 2 years with no recordable injuries. “Safety performance like this is important in keeping a competitive edge in an ultra-competitive market. More importantly, the effort and dedication of our employees toward health and safety are critical in going home the same way they arrived at work, injury free” states Bryce Cook, HSSE Manager.

We would like to extend a very special thank you to all of the Leduc employees who continue to make safety a priority every day. While the team acknowledges that this is a great accomplishment to take pride in, they are not ready to stop here.