Tag Archives : Delaware Basin


Oilfield Technology June 2016

Featured in the June issue of Oilfield Technology, Ulterra discusses how customized bit development for RSS reduces tool failure.

Most RSS tools are highly susceptible to failure due to vibration, which is one of the most common reasons the BHA must be tripped. Ulterra’s CounterForce® technology uses the cutting structure to reduce vibrations at the bit, which increases efficiency and reduces bit damage.

PDF_download_IconOilfield Technology June 2016


Ulterra Celebrates Recent Success with Rotary Steerable Systems in the Wolfbone Area

By: Josh Criswell, West Texas Sales Engineer

In the past six months, operators drilling in the Wolfbone area of the Delaware Basin have been looking more to rotary steerable systems (RSS) to reduce the time spent drilling lateral wells. RSS have become a more affordable option due to their reduced cost in the down market.

Ulterra was challenged to create a bit design that was capable of finishing extended laterals in one run while encountering shales with varying carbonate content. This new design must rotate exceptionally well, be able to produce accurate corrections on a motorized push-the-bit system, and withstand the higher RPM capabilities of new rotary steerable systems.

This resulted in Ulterra’s 8.5” U616S built to dominate these intervals. The U616S features Ulterra’s CounterForce® technology which provides smooth torque responses providing longer life for expensive rotary steerable components. CounterForce also redirects vibrations back into the formation, creating a much more efficient cutting structure that produces higher ROP. The U616S also features an extended gauge pad to help the bit track in long laterals and reduce corrective actions. This new CounterForce design features a steel construction that increases the junk slot area by nearly 12% from its matrix counterpart and allows lower cuttings evacuation times producing higher ROP.

After its first two runs, Ulterra’s 8.5” U616S CounterForce completed both intervals successfully in one run producing an average ROP 15% higher than competitor designs. The ability to complete the interval in one run while producing higher ROP allowed Ulterra to save the operator an average of $7.24/ft for a total of $67,049 in a lateral well.


Ulterra Celebrates a Major Accomplishment with Operator in the Delaware Basin

By: Tyler Browder, National Account Representative

 

In previous months, the typical wellbore design for a major operator in the Delaware Basin had been a 3 string well utilizing a 13 ½” surface hole, 9 ⅞” intermediate, and 6 ¾” production. With the current down market, the operator like every other operator has been looking for other ways to bring down cost and have better efficiency. One way they sought partially increased performance was by bumping up to a bigger casing profile, yet still utilizing a 3 string well design by drilling a 16” surface, 12 ¼” intermediate, and 8 ½” production hole. They saw a large step change in performance in the 8 ½” production hole, but saw a substantial decrease in efficiency in the now 12 ¼” intermediate section. The performance change was great enough in the production hole to make the operator explore ways to optimize performance in the intermediate to make it more economical.

This new 12 ¼” deep intermediate was taking an average of 5 BHA’s to reach section Total Depth (TD), running almost every bit company possible and not seeing any positive results. After a hand full of wells, the operator dedicated the top part of the section to a competitor and the bottom hole (the demanding interval) to Ulterra’s U616M. The U616M had the fastest average ROP in the top section of the interval as well, but they saw faster instantaneous ROP with the competitor bit and thought they could improve and achieve a higher average…. that didn’t happen. Ulterra started looking into Rock Strength Analysis (RSA) and Electronic Drilling Recording (EDR) data to come up with an overall game plan of how to attack this interval. There were several meetings with the engineering team over this project which combined our bit knowledge with their overall knowledge of the application. Ulterra chose a bit and recommended parameters to try and achieve a more PDC friendly environment within this interbedded formation, reaching almost 30,000 KSI in some parts. Ulterra proved that the U616M was the fastest bit on the 1 trial run the operator had at the beginning of the program. We recognized that we could get much deeper with the U616M in the drill out BHA with optimized drilling parameters, coupled with the right bit design and cutter technology for the interval. Ulterra showed that if the operator can get deeper on BHA #1 the chances of achieving a 2-3 bit interval would be greatly increased due to the outstanding performance we were already seeing in the bottom section of the interval, and with the U616M dull conditions when pulled at section TD.

Ulterra did just that.

In the drill out, the U616M made it from 2,073 ft to 8,469 ft in one run at 113.2 ft/hr. In the previous offset well, the first competitor bit made it to 7,000 ft at 98 ft/hr, while the second tripped at 8,000 ft averaging 48 ft/hr. So with one bit Ulterra drilled 469 ft further and at a much faster pace than 2 competitor bits. Ulterra then went in for the second BHA in this interval and made it all the way to section TD at 10,193 ft at 111.2 ft/hr. With this well using 100% Ulterra it drilled 4.6 days faster than the average well of this design, and 2.27 days faster than the Best Demonstrated Performance (BDP) well. This was all achieved from a great transparent working relationship between the operator, the service company, as well as great bit designs from the men behind the scenes.